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Oct 21, 2015

Mayo grad students reach out to their neighbors (in El Salvador)

By Carl Gustafson @carlgustafson
Written by Crystal Mendoza and Carl Gustafson The Biomedical Engineering and Physiology (BMEP) students are going global! In 2009, a few students got together and formed the Initiative for Medical Equipment Sustainability (IMES) to address issues of transferring medical technology to developing countries, and making those technologies sustainable. Since then, [...]
Mayo grad students reach out to their neighbors (in El Salvador)
Sep 24, 2015

Looking at Diversity: From the Top Down

By Crystal Mendoza @crystalmendoza
By Domenic Fraboni At times, diversity can be a difficult area to be “successful” in.  This can be especially true when trying to represent all the different aspects of diversity in a specific committee, staff, team, or any other group.  The complexity of this topic webs out even further when [...]
Looking at Diversity: From the Top Down
Sep 17, 2015

Exploring the World through Research

By Clara Castillejobecerra @claracastillejobecerra
By Luz Milbeth Cumba-García, MS At the age of 16, I was admitted to the Universidad Metropolitana’s early admission program in San Juan, Puerto Rico, to study Cellular and Molecular Biology. From my early days as a college student, I had the opportunity to do summer internships abroad, conduct research [...]
Exploring the World through Research
Jul 30, 2015

Does gender bias benefit women in academia?

By Clara Castillejobecerra @claracastillejobecerra
Historically, women have been underrepresented in the fields of science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM). This trend seems to be predominant in academia, where sexist hiring has been labeled as one of the culprits. But does current evidence support this hypothesis? Research from Cornell psychologists, Wendy Williams and Stephen Ceci, [...]
Jul 16, 2015

Grey Lines - Stepping Over the Interdisciplinary Boundary in Healthcare Education

By Andrew M. Harrison @andrewharrison1
By Thomas Mork I was sitting in Phillips Hall in the Siebens Building at Mayo Clinic, immersed in a speech by “Bob”: former patient, cancer survivor, and nationally-renowned speaker. He stood proudly at the podium while his voice reverberated among a crowd of physicians, nurses, and physical therapy students. This [...]
Grey Lines - Stepping Over the Interdisciplinary Boundary in Healthcare Education
Jul 5, 2015

Read this while standing

By Carl Gustafson @carlgustafson
“What you are doing, right now, is killing you!” Nilofer Merchant scanned a suddenly breathless crowd with a faux menace at her 2013 TED talk. The audience anxiously awaited her answer: what could possibly be killing us so menacingly and discretely that we would simply sit here and allow it? Well, [...]
May 13, 2015

Believe it or not...

By Andrew M. Harrison @andrewharrison1
By Dr. Jim Maher How can Mayo Clinic best honor the axis of diversity that might be called "faith," "belief," "unbelief," or "religion" and what leadership can be shown within Mayo Clinic's academic environment (the Mayo Clinic College of Medicine)? These were some of the questions that motivated a fascinating [...]
Believe it or not...
Mar 19, 2015

Becoming a Question Artist

By Carl Gustafson @carlgustafson
“In re mathematica ars proponendi quaestionem pluris facienda est quam solvendi.” – Georg Cantor Just when you thought Latin was a dead language… If I were to ask you a question, how would you answer it? …Did you just tell yourself, “well, Self, that depends on the type of question!”? [...]
Feb 26, 2015

The Banality of “That’s Nice”

By Andrew M. Harrison @andrewharrison1
By Nora E. King I sat in Mayo Clinic’s St. Marys Hospital cafeteria with my clinical team, in that awkward way medical students know too well: the attending physician (“consultant” at Mayo Clinic) buys you a cup of coffee and then proceeds to gossip with his buddies for the next [...]
The Banality of “That’s Nice”
Jan 29, 2015

Training in Research and Parenthood

By Clara Castillejobecerra @claracastillejobecerra
Perhaps you are contemplating becoming a parent in the future. If so, you may be wondering how becoming a parent will affect your career, how you will handle your responsibilities as a researcher and parent, or how you will survive these tough years in graduate school with the addition of [...]
Training in Research and Parenthood
Jan 4, 2015

Avoiding scientific nostalgia

By Carl Gustafson @carlgustafson
Hello diversity blog readers and welcome to 2015! Thanks for sticking with us; we hope you’re as excited about the future of the blog as we are. If not, keep reading. Maybe someday we'll serve up the post you've been waiting for. Science moves pretty fast [citation needed]. In fact, it’s [...]
Dec 18, 2014

Should dual degree training exist?

By Andrew M. Harrison @andrewharrison1
By Andrew M. Harrison No, I will not be writing about the illustrious EdD-JD. However, please note these are both largely regarded as “professional” doctoral degrees in the US. Although still less relevant in the US, you should know the difference, as most of the rest of the world draws [...]
Should dual degree training exist?
Dec 8, 2014

Adapting to Rochester

By Annyoceli Santiago @annyocelisantiago
By Annyoceli Santiago I remember when I was accepted into the Postbaccalaureate Research Education Program (PREP) at Mayo Clinic two years ago. I was extremely excited about moving to the United States to do research. When I told my friends and professors that I had been accepted to PREP, most [...]
Adapting to Rochester
Nov 20, 2014

Overcoming Imposter Syndrome

By Crystal Mendoza @crystalmendoza
In the midst of studying for my written qualifying exam, I began to panic. It was a mixed panic, the jitters you get before a big exam coupled with a crippling self-doubt. I had experienced this same self-doubt before, when I was first accepted into Mayo Graduate School (MGS). I [...]
Oct 9, 2014

What are we eating?

By Carl Gustafson @carlgustafson
Contrary to popular belief, Facebook can be good for something every now and then. While wasting precious time on Facebook (shh! don’t tell my PI!), I stumbled across this blog post, by an endocrinologist in California who compared his dining experience at the Googleplex, to his dining experiences at various [...]
Oct 1, 2014

Gender Equality: Women’s Rights are Human Rights

By Andrew M. Harrison @andrewharrison1
By Wells B. LaRiviere Note: Sex refers to the biological assignment of reproductive anatomy, while gender refers to a spectrum of social and cultural roles associated with sex. This post touches on both, but for the sake of brevity, I will not explore this complex subject further. On the afternoon [...]
Gender Equality: Women’s Rights are Human Rights
Sep 12, 2014

The Greatest Taboo: Mental Illness, Society, Science, and Medicine

By Andrew M. Harrison @andrewharrison1
By Andrew M. Harrison In 1902, Bertrand Russell wrote, “Mathematics, rightly viewed, possesses not only truth, but supreme beauty—a beauty cold and austere, like that of sculpture, without appeal to any part of our weaker nature, without the gorgeous trappings of painting or music, yet sublimely pure, and capable of [...]
The Greatest Taboo: Mental Illness, Society, Science, and Medicine
Sep 4, 2014

Avoiding a Career as a Perpetual Postdoc

By Clara Castillejobecerra @claracastillejobecerra
As trainees, we are faced with a frustrating reality-- the job market cannot meet the increasing supply of PhDs. We know this and most of us decide to pursue further postdoctoral training in order to become more qualified for the limited positions. Unfortunately, the few years we anticipate for postdoctoral [...]
Aug 24, 2014

Learning to Listen: Doing Federal Policy from the Bottom-Up in Indian Country

By Andrew M. Harrison @andrewharrison1
By Ibrahim Garba, MA, JD, LLM In a Philosophy and Medicine course I took in graduate school, the professor spent the semester comparing two models of medicine: the biomedical and the humanistic. Broadly speaking, the biomedical model is based on a view of persons being measurable, empirical entities that can [...]
Learning to Listen: Doing Federal Policy from the Bottom-Up in Indian Country
Jul 10, 2014

Lessons from My First Year in Graduate School

By Crystal Mendoza @crystalmendoza
I would like to thank my fellow Diversity Blog editors for their helpful advice and input for this blog post. As summer begins, my first year of graduate school comes to an end. The fact that my first year of graduate school has come to a close brings mixed [...]
Jun 29, 2014

Why aren’t more white males a part of the Lean In discussion at Mayo Clinic?

By Andrew M. Harrison @andrewharrison1
By Rielyn R. Campbell I think Jackson Katz said it best in his Ted talk from November 2012, “A lot of men hear the term “women’s issues” and we tend to tune it out, and we think, “Hey, I’m a guy. That’s for girls.” Or “That’s for the women.” And [...]
Why aren’t more white males a part of the Lean In discussion at Mayo Clinic?
Jun 5, 2014

DREAMing a Career in Science (Undocumented Students’ Pursuit of Science Careers)

By Clara Castillejobecerra @claracastillejobecerra
On June 15, 2012, the Obama administration announced the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program, which provides deportation relief for a period of two years to qualified undocumented youth who came to the United States as children. While deferred action does not confer lawful status in the United States, [...]
DREAMing a Career in Science (Undocumented Students’ Pursuit of Science Careers)
May 29, 2014

This is your mind on grad school: The state of graduate student mental health at UC Berkeley

By Carl Gustafson @carlgustafson
Editor’s note: This article was first published in the Spring 2014 edition of the Berkeley Science Review. It has been re-posted to the Mayo Clinic Diversity in Education blog with the direct, written consent of the original authors. You may view the original article here.
This is your mind on grad school: The state of graduate student mental health at UC Berkeley
May 22, 2014

Finding a science Profession, or What do I want to be when I grow up?

By Andrew M. Harrison @andrewharrison1
By Stephen C. Ekker, PhD High angst for a PhD student in life sciences today. From the mea culpa ‘Rescuing US biomedical research from its systemic flaws’ in published in PNAS by Drs. Alberts, Kirschner, Tilghman, and Varmus, to the high uncertainty of public funding of science, it is understandable [...]
Finding a science Profession, or What do I want to be when I grow up?
May 19, 2014

Perception vs. Reality: The LGBTI Struggle and Experience

By Carl Gustafson @carlgustafson
By Carl T. Gustafson and Andrew M. Harrison Last Tuesday, the Mayo Clinic College of Medicine’s Office for Diversity held its third Discussions in Diversity event. The four panelists were Ann M. Farrell (Mayo Clinic Librarian and Secretary of Mayo Clinic’s LGBTI Employee Resource Group), Joseph D. Gallego (student, Mayo [...]
Perception vs. Reality: The LGBTI Struggle and Experience
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