crystalmendoza

Crystal Mendoza @crystalmendoza

Activity by Crystal Mendoza @crystalmendoza

crystalmendoza

Apr 17, 2016 by @crystalmendoza · View  

Moving Towards Equity in Medicine

By: Domenic Fraboni and Crystal Mendoza

April 13th was Equal Pay Day. At a panel discussion, Women in Science and Medicine: Moving Toward Equity in Career and Professional Development sponsored by the Office for Diversity, we learned that Equal Pay Day represents the day that women needed to work until in 2016 (added to their 2015 salary) to earn what their male counterparts earned during the 2015 calendar year. This discussion, led by a panel of Mayo physician and scientists, was tackling this exact issue and its prominence in the medial and science fields.

Guest moderator, Sharonne Hayes, M.D., began the discussion by outlining concerning statistics that represent the current inequality in medical career advancement between sexes.  To begin, [...]

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crystalmendoza

Jan 27, 2016 by @crystalmendoza · View  

Medical "Marriage" - Improving the Clinician-Patient Relationship

By: Thomas Mork

“What do you know about him?” inquired my clinical instructor. I was on my first rotation as a student at the University of Utah and, using only two hands, was still able to count the number of patients I had seen. I commenced listing my patient’s home environment, his physical capabilities, etc. My clinical instructor cut me off. “That’s great, Tom, but what do you know about him?” I pondered the question for a moment.

“Well, he was a high school teacher.” I replied, questioningly. My clinical instructor smiled. “That’s it”, he said. And he made my goal for the next four weeks to learn something about the lives of my patients.

By the [...]

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carlgustafson

Carl Gustafson responded Jan 28, 2016 · View

Great article Tom! Thanks for sharing. I really like your point about students being more concerned about renin-angiotensin (or whatever rigorous scientific topic) and less concerned about learning to connect well or communicate well. It seems like changing that attitude may benefit many scientists and clinicians.

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crystalmendoza

Dec 17, 2015 by @crystalmendoza · View  

WiSER Presents: Women in Science and Engineering Series- Elke Mühlberger

By: Robin Willenbring

Being human is hard sometimes.

Now, to add to that, many of us reading this particular blog post, are human scientists or in the medical field. There have been too many times to count that each of us has questioned our life’s choice, our sanity and thought about being anything else. What keeps us going? That is the age old question, isn’t it? For each the answer is different. However, there is one defining feature, our passion. Whether it’s a passion for developing technologies, teaching the next generation, caring for the sick, running a company, thinking critically, or viruses; each is a passion. Throughout our careers, we find ways to share this passion, through our publications, [...]

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crystalmendoza

Dec 3, 2015 by @crystalmendoza · View  

It's on Us

By Domenic Fraboni

The “It’s on US” campaign is a White House based movement that aims to increase awareness of sexual assault and sexual assault prevention.  I learned about the “It’s on US” campaign in January of last year when the NCAA became an official partner of the campaign.  As a member of the Division III Student Athlete Advisory Committee (DIII SAAC) I was tasked with bringing the campaign back to my respective conferences and campuses.  The “It’s on US” mission immediately resonated with me.  As a college football student-athlete I often felt subject to some unfair stereotypes of male student-athletes, specifically football athletes, and how they treated women.  Then I faced the real facts.  During their collegiate experience, one in [...]

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crystalmendoza

Nov 22, 2015 by @crystalmendoza · View  

Humanitarianism and medicine

By Crystal A. Mendoza and Andrew M. Harrison

Humanitarianism medicine stands apart from both academic and non-academic medicine. Although not mutually exclusive, humanitarianism medicine is one component of the larger field of humanitarianism: a vast conceptual construct of community that transcends individual civilizations and societies across time. On November 18, 2015, the Mayo Clinic Dolores Jean Lavins Center for Humanities hosted Dr. James J. Orbinski, 1999 Nobel Peace Prize Laureate, for its inaugural Rewoldt Nobel Laureate Lecture.

Dr. Orbinski, physician, humanitarian leader, and emeritus President of the International Council of Médecins Sans Frontières (Doctors Without Borders), gave two lectures in Rochester, MN: “Humanitarianism In War: Médecins Sans Frontières And Beyond” and “Equity And Global Health — An [...]

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Nov 19, 2015 by @crystalmendoza · View  

WiSER Takes Off!

Women in Science and Engineering Research (WiSER) has one mission: To support the success of women in research by providing opportunities for career development, networking with women leaders, identifying strong mentors, and developing a meaningful community for women in biomedical research at Mayo Clinic. They are off to a great start!

The group, founded by Kay Pepin and Mekala Raman, began with one key observation: women within Mayo Graduate School make up over half of the students (62%), both PhD and MD/PhD, but that number is not reflected in the Research Fellow population where men make up 62%. The gender disparity is even more striking for faculty, where women comprise only 21% of full faculty. These startling statistics are not unheard of for most [...]

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Nov 5, 2015 by @crystalmendoza · View  

Profession ≠ Job

By: Thomas Mork, SPT

What do you love about your profession? Is it seeing patients smile? Is it putting on your detective cap to figure out a disease? Or is it the sheer variety of the cases that you see every day? The fact is, if we go to work for one of these reasons, or one I haven’t mentioned, we are extremely fortunate; we are part of an exclusive club that enjoys our job. We are the ones that think about our patients as we make dinner, or research best practice for some light, nighttime reading. But our vocation comes with responsibility to ourselves and our colleagues. It is our duty to protect and advance our profession and further our [...]

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Sep 24, 2015 by @crystalmendoza · View  

Looking at Diversity: From the Top Down

By Domenic Fraboni

At times, diversity can be a difficult area to be “successful” in.  This can be especially true when trying to represent all the different aspects of diversity in a specific committee, staff, team, or any other group.  The complexity of this topic webs out even further when including those non-superficial definitions of diversity: ethnicity, religion, orientation, social, family type, education, and the list could continue on.  It may seem to be an obvious statement, but if we have diversity of any sort, we will only be able to better understand, collaborate upon, and ultimately solve the issues that face us every day.  With this being said, why do so many organizations fall short when it comes to fully [...]

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crystalmendoza

Nov 20, 2014 by @crystalmendoza · View  

Overcoming Imposter Syndrome

In the midst of studying for my written qualifying exam, I began to panic. It was a mixed panic, the jitters you get before a big exam coupled with a crippling self-doubt. I had experienced this same self-doubt before, when I was first accepted into Mayo Graduate School (MGS). I did not feel like I had earned my place in graduate school, especially at Mayo Clinic, and that my accomplishments felt like nothing compared to those of my peers. I came into graduate school with only two years of “real” college experience, as I had taken dual credit courses in high school and lacked substantial life experience. The courses I had taken in college were difficult in some cases, but for the most part manageable [...]

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iamathena

Athena responded Nov 21, 2014 · View

This is all me. Nice article. Thank you =)

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crystalmendoza

Jul 10, 2014 by @crystalmendoza · View  

Lessons from My First Year in Graduate School

I would like to thank my fellow Diversity Blog editors for their helpful advice and input for this blog post.

As summer begins, my first year of graduate school comes to an end. The fact that my first year of graduate school has come to a close brings mixed feelings. I have come a bit further than I was at this same time last year, and thankfully, have learned a few things. In honor of the incoming graduate school class, I have decided to dedicate this post to them to hopefully offer some helpful advice on first-year experiences.

The most important aspect of a PhD is the mentor and lab in which you will be conducting your thesis work. It’s easy to get [...]

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crystalmendoza

Apr 3, 2014 by @crystalmendoza · View  

107 students+ 42 volunteers= 1 successful event

By: Robin Willenbring

Volunteer teaching elementary students about neuroanatomy using real animal brains.

Volunteer teaching elementary students about neuroanatomy using real animal brains.

On a monthly basis, medical and graduate students receive an email from the Brainwaves team with the subject line containing some phrase including “Brainwaves Event”. Let’s be honest; a good portion of people automatically delete this. One reason might be that you have no idea what Brainwaves is (I know this because I have received guilt ridden apologies from people). Since you delete these emails (disclaimer: in the future you should actually read them), you most likely have no idea what this program is, [...]

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crystalmendoza

Mar 14, 2014 by @crystalmendoza · View  

Embracing Diversity

I never considered myself diverse. I know this may sound contradictory considering I’m writing for the Education in Diversity Blog, but let me explain. I grew up in El Paso, TX, one of the many cities along the U.S.-Mexico border. The border encompasses Texas, New Mexico, Arizona, and California on the U.S. side and Tamaulipas, Nuevo León, Coahuila, Chihuahua, Sonora, and Baja California Norte on the Mexican side. Both of my parents were born in Chihuahua, Mexico and moved to the United Sates when they were kids. Years later, they met and had me here in the U.S. thus making me first-generation American. Growing up on the border offers an interesting take on issues of immigration, race, and the blending of cultures. The issues many [...]

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dinky3465

Denise Youngsteadt-Parrish responded Jun 12, 2014 · View

Maria, thanks for sharing a story of victory, finding your way and learning to love who you are. I agree with you that belonging and blending in seems to override so much of our actions and thoughts, that we forget the richness of our own lives.

owend

OwenD responded Jun 12, 2014 · View

Hi Crystal, I find your story more common than not. In fact, many would probably say that you assimilated and would have a different take on being willing to speak Spanish. You are to be commended for being proud to be who you are. I come from a culture where we were taught to be more like the majority culture so that we would "fit in". Depending on your cultural reference and your socioeconomic background, [...]

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