andrewharrison1

Andrew M. Harrison @andrewharrison1

Activity by Andrew M. Harrison @andrewharrison1

andrewharrison1

Sep 29, 2016 by @andrewharrison1 · View  

Invisible Disability

By Andrew M. Harrison

The time: January 2010. The place: The barren cornfield-tundra (then tundra) of Rochester, Minnesota. The setting: Other applicants and current students enjoying drunkenly sliding along the sheets of black ice, but you are in pain and hiding a back brace under your clothing from a spine surgery two weeks ago. Do you: (A) join along and hope nothing goes wrong, (B) point out you are weak for the aforementioned reasons and risk judgement, (C) act uptight and risk a different form of non-weak judgement, or (D) cry and risk every judgement?

I am not a fan of "fancy" words or terms, but this is known as invisible disability. When I broke my neck a [...]

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andrewharrison1

Sep 12, 2016 by @andrewharrison1 · View  

The Sights and Sounds of Diversity of Mayo Clinic

By Domenic F. Fraboni and Andrew M. Harrison

There I was (DFF). Standing in front of the crowd that had gathered at Mayo Clinic College of Medicine's Annual Diversity Welcome Reception on Wednesday, September 07, 2016. I may have been one of a handful of people in that room that had never lived outside of Minnesota. A good number of the individuals in the room had even lived or grown up outside the country. I also don’t have what I call great surface diversity. This is what most individuals may think of when they think of diversity: race, ethnicity, and culture (and I would say rightfully so as it is a significant component of diversity). By that standard, I represent the [...]

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andrewharrison1

Mar 3, 2016 by @andrewharrison1 · View  

The beginning of wisdom

By Andrew M. Harrison

Is racism the result of one of the basic human emotions, social disorder, both, or neither? Is this question even valid? From contemporary American psychologists such as Paul Ekman and Robert Plutchik, I can stretch an argument racism is derived from some basic human emotion and thus a sort of fundamental human right. From the ancient Analects of Confucius, I can argue “the beginning of wisdom is to call things by their proper name” and thus racism is the result of some improperly balanced social construct.

On Wednesday, February 10, 2016, Mayo Clinic’s Office for Diversity (Mayo Clinic College of Medicine) hosted its 5th Diversity Discussion at Mayo Clinic’s Rochester campus in Minnesota: “Social Justice: [...]

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Jul 16, 2015 by @andrewharrison1 · View  

Grey Lines - Stepping Over the Interdisciplinary Boundary in Healthcare Education

By Thomas Mork

I was sitting in Phillips Hall in the Siebens Building at Mayo Clinic, immersed in a speech by “Bob”: former patient, cancer survivor, and nationally-renowned speaker. He stood proudly at the podium while his voice reverberated among a crowd of physicians, nurses, and physical therapy students. This self-described “active patient” defied cancer by becoming a dynamic advocate for himself during his medical care. As his story goes, he brought forward multiple treatment options that his physician never considered. They decided to try these treatments when standard care was failing. Over a year later he is still cancer free and advocating to people across the nation to become active members of their healthcare team. The ideas he brought forth [...]

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May 13, 2015 by @andrewharrison1 · View  

Believe it or not...

By Dr. Jim Maher

How can Mayo Clinic best honor the axis of diversity that might be called "faith," "belief," "unbelief," or "religion" and what leadership can be shown within Mayo Clinic's academic environment (the Mayo Clinic College of Medicine)? These were some of the questions that motivated a fascinating lunch session on May 11, 2015, organized by the College of Medicine Office for Diversity, and featuring a delightful panel representing a sampling of four faith traditions different from the nominal Christianity that typified 78% of Americans in 2010. The premise of the discussion ("Religious Diversity in the Mayo Clinic College of Medicine: Positive Expression, Ongoing Challenges") was that global faith traditions, including agnosticism and atheism, are richly diverse, and the [...]

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txmed7

txmed7 responded May 13, 2015 · View

I was in attendance and can't say enough about the quality of content and format, thanks!

txmed7

txmed7 responded May 13, 2015 · View

🙂

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andrewharrison1

Feb 26, 2015 by @andrewharrison1 · View  

The Banality of “That’s Nice”

By Nora E. King

I sat in Mayo Clinic’s St. Marys Hospital cafeteria with my clinical team, in that awkward way medical students know too well: the attending physician (“consultant” at Mayo Clinic) buys you a cup of coffee and then proceeds to gossip with his buddies for the next 15 minutes. It’s never clear whether you should chuckle along with the stories or pretend to not listen, absorbed in your notes on the patient list.

Unusually, the cafeteria was filled with music. “What’s that noise?” someone said. We glanced around and noticed a poster with sepia photos of famous Black Americans. “Oh, it’s Black History Month,” his colleague replied, “that’s nice. Let’s get out of here, the music [...]

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khedin

k hedin responded Feb 27, 2015 · View

Thanks, Nora, for pointing out these possibly banal, but uncomfortable, truths.....we need to raise our awareness to decrease unconscious biases.

lauriejl2

Momof4&student responded Apr 16, 2015 · View

Thank you Nora. I realize this article is not current; but, I bet is defiantly a ongoing situation in college and universities and not unique to the Mayo Clinic. Ever campus I have ever attended seemed to just have a few Black history month celebrations and think that qualified them to check that of the list. I am thinking those difficult conversations that you wrote about: privilege, our own offenses, failures, and superficiality is just [...]

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andrewharrison1

Dec 18, 2014 by @andrewharrison1 · View  

Should dual degree training exist?

By Andrew M. Harrison

No, I will not be writing about the illustrious EdD-JD. However, please note these are both largely regarded as “professional” doctoral degrees in the US. Although still less relevant in the US, you should know the difference, as most of the rest of the world draws a clear distinction between a research doctorate and a “first professional degree”.

As data interferes with effecting social changes (for better or worse), and blogs are by nature not designed to be lengthy, let’s get this part out of the way first and fast. More Commentaries on the subject of MD-PhD training have been published in the academic literature than I care to discuss. The most comprehensive [...]

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tandatdu

tanda responded Dec 19, 2014 · View

Mr. Harrison, I commend your attempt to tackle this subject, but you're missing the big picture. I'll assume that “your” answer to your own over-arching question is yes, dual-degree training should exist. And I agree with you. Although on a more informal plane, dual-degree training has existed for hundreds of years, and a decent physician or scientist worth his salt such as Vesalius, Galen or Louis Pasteur were all trained in multiple disciples, most of [...]

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andrewharrison1

Oct 1, 2014 by @andrewharrison1 · View  

Gender Equality: Women’s Rights are Human Rights

By Wells B. LaRiviere

Note: Sex refers to the biological assignment of reproductive anatomy, while gender refers to a spectrum of social and cultural roles associated with sex. This post touches on both, but for the sake of brevity, I will not explore this complex subject further.

On the afternoon of September 18th, 2014, Dr. Karen Hedin (Professor, Mayo Clinic Department of Immunology) hosted a discussion entitled “Women in Science: Problems and Brainstorming Solutions,” an important extension of the ongoing discussion of sex equality at Mayo Clinic. The conference room on the 15th floor of the Guggenheim building was well past capacity and overflowed with students, staff, and faculty alike. However, just as Rielyn Campbell (Education Coordinator, Mayo [...]

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andrewharrison1

Sep 12, 2014 by @andrewharrison1 · View  

The Greatest Taboo: Mental Illness, Society, Science, and Medicine

By Andrew M. Harrison

In 1902, Bertrand Russell wrote, “Mathematics, rightly viewed, possesses not only truth, but supreme beauty—a beauty cold and austere, like that of sculpture, without appeal to any part of our weaker nature, without the gorgeous trappings of painting or music, yet sublimely pure, and capable of a stern perfection such as only the greatest art can show.” Beautiful words by one of my heroes and also the pathetic opening to my medical school application essay in the summer of 2009. I did not even get the date correct, but it did not matter then and does not matter now. This post is not about facts and figures: my comfort zone. This post is about emotions and the [...]

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Aug 24, 2014 by @andrewharrison1 · View  

Learning to Listen: Doing Federal Policy from the Bottom-Up in Indian Country

By Ibrahim Garba, MA, JD, LLM

In a Philosophy and Medicine course I took in graduate school, the professor spent the semester comparing two models of medicine: the biomedical and the humanistic. Broadly speaking, the biomedical model is based on a view of persons being measurable, empirical entities that can be restored to health through the return of bodily functions and processes to a state of normalcy (statistically defined). In contrast, the humanistic model proposes a dualistic view of personhood, framing humans as being constituted of both “body” and “self”. Consequently, restoring the measurable, empirical component of a person (i.e. the body) is only part of the task of healing. There remains the self, an entity so easily caricatured as the [...]

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andrewharrison1

Jun 29, 2014 by @andrewharrison1 · View  

Why aren’t more white males a part of the Lean In discussion at Mayo Clinic?

By Rielyn R. Campbell

I think Jackson Katz said it best in his Ted talk from November 2012, “A lot of men hear the term “women’s issues” and we tend to tune it out, and we think, “Hey, I’m a guy. That’s for girls.” Or “That’s for the women.” And “a lot of men literally don’t get beyond the first sentence as a result.” I hope if you are a man reading this, you get past the first sentence.

On June 19, 2014, I attended the Lean In session (link through Mayo Clinic intranet only), hosted by Mayo Clinic’s Office of Diversity and Inclusion and several Mayo Employee Resource Groups (MERGs). After opening remarks from Dr. [...]

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romell2014

Deborah responded Jul 2, 2014 · View

Hello Owen, I am in agreement that the authors story is "a common one in....arena". Fortunately, I have still yet to experience such as a "person of color" however I do realize that I am not exempt I think that our society still has struggles and issues with colored people which will forever impact how we are treated and how far we may go. What, if any, were you able to do with your experience?

owend

OwenD responded Jul 3, 2014 · View

Hi Deborah, thank you for your response and for your question. It has been a tumultuous journey for me. What I have always done is give 100% effort and always conduct myself with the highest of integrity. I have fell along the way in how I handled certain situations. However, at the end of the day, I like to think that I made a difference for those who are coming behind me. I challenged a [...]

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May 22, 2014 by @andrewharrison1 · View  

Finding a science Profession, or What do I want to be when I grow up?

By Stephen C. Ekker, PhD

High angst for a PhD student in life sciences today. From the mea culpaRescuing US biomedical research from its systemic flaws’ in published in PNAS by Drs. Alberts, Kirschner, Tilghman, and Varmus, to the high uncertainty of public funding of science, it is understandable – and very appropriate – for young scientists to be concerned about their future.

Chen, Ekker, and Davis

Dr. Ekker with Drs. Eleanor Chen and Ann Davidson, both former grad students in the Ekker lab and both pursuing their own science adventures (one in the US, one now in Canada).

Although all of the current [...]

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Mar 27, 2014 by @andrewharrison1 · View  

A New Frontier, Palliative Care in Ethiopia

By Matthew J. Borgo

From February 23 through March 1, 2014, I had an experience which I will not soon forget. I had the great fortune of being able to travel to Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, spend time with the Gynecology/Obstetrics/Oncology team at Zewditu Memorial Hospital, and attend the 50th Annual Meeting of the Ethiopian Medical Association (EMA) in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. The theme of this anniversary meeting was Medical Tourism and Healthcare and over one thousand health professionals were in attendance.

Ethiopia is a country of many different ethnic groups. With a population estimated at almost 97 million, it is the 14th most populous country in the world. Life expectancy is currently 60.7 years with 0.03 physicians per [...]

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nardimoon

Nardos responded Jun 12, 2014 · View

Dear Dr. Matthew J. Borgo Greetings. It is with interest that I read your article on Ethiopia. Thank you. I have been a long time advocate of palliative care and pain management in Ethiopia and yes the challenges are tremendous ... but the commitment to this issue is also increasing especially at the policy level. There is a struggling national palliative care association all volunteer-based screaming to he heard. We have to date only 4 [...]

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Feb 20, 2014 by @andrewharrison1 · View  

A Secret World – A Reflection on Homosexuality in the Islamic World

By Fareed Khawaja

NOTE (AMH): This post has been re-posted after the addition of new material. However, no removal of or changes to the original content were made.

There have been many successes for gay rights in the United States lately. With the recent strides made in both Utah and Oklahoma, one can say that the gay movement in America is progressing well. But what is the situation like for the LGBTI community in more conservative countries? To be more precise: the Islamic world.

In Islam, homosexuality is forbidden in both the Quran (Islamic holy book) and the Hadith (the sayings of the Holy Prophet), the two most important sources of Islamic [...]

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nelson

J. Nelson responded Feb 23, 2014 · View

I recently watched a documentary about homosexual men escaping from Iran to Turkey. I became interested. I ran across photos of men in cages with bags on their heads facing courts that would inevitably find them guilty for their sexual orientation. I thought about how blessed that I am as a gay man. I may face inequality, but never such treatment. May this group find peace in their homelands.

fareedk

FareedK responded Feb 25, 2014 · View

In response to the first comment, I wanted to say that the point of this article was not to target or offend Islam. As a practicing Muslim, I have great respect for the teachings of Islam. The point of the article was to discuss Islam and homosexuality today. I merely wanted to share my observations on the topic, being a member of both worlds. Although I may not have a doctorate in the subject, I [...]

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andrewharrison1

Nov 14, 2013 by @andrewharrison1 · View  

Seeking a Diversity of Opinions in Health Care Policy

By Joshua J. Faucher

I returned two weeks ago from the Physicians for a National Health Program (PNHP) 2013 Annual Meeting, which took place on November 2nd in Boston, MA. It was the third PNHP Annual Meeting I have attended, and my first as a student member of the organization’s Board of Directors. I can say that the meeting was a rousing success, and that we had a record number of attendees (including over 130 medical and health professional students – the largest number ever)! Can I say, however, that we are approaching the final realization of our goal:  the implementation of single-payer national health [...]

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Aug 22, 2013 by @andrewharrison1 · View  

The American Indian Health Crisis – A reflection on the AAIP 42nd Annual Meeting

By Timothy N. Kruse

On July 31 through August 04, 2013, Andrew Harrison and I attended the 42nd Annual Meeting of the Association of American Indian Physicians (AAIP) in Santa Clara, CA. The AAIP is an organization for American Indian and Alaska Native physicians across North America. The Mission of the AAIP is “to pursue excellence in Native American health care by promoting education in the medical disciplines, honoring traditional healing principles and restoring the balance of mind, body, and spirit”.

Association of American Indian Physicians

[...]

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